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Month: March 2010

Total Church 2.0 Conference Audio

The Total Church 2.0 Conference: I Will Build My Church audio is up. This was our second Total Church Conference and it took much of what we discussed in the first Total Church conference and tried to move it forward to see what it looks like to live in Jesus community on Jesus mission motivated by the Gospel of Jesus Kingdom.

Main Session 1: The Cross and the Missional Church (coming soon) Michael Goheen
The crucifixion has often been interpreted simply in terms of its benefits for individual people. While true, this is inadequate. When the cross is placed in the context of the literary structure of the gospels and in the context of the whole biblical story, the cross has cosmic and ecclesiological significance. This talk will unfold the cosmic scope, communal significance, and the transforming power of the cross, all of which produce a missional people.

Main Session 2: The Significance of the Cross and Resurrection for a Missional Church (Part 1) Michael Goheen
The crucifixion has often been interpreted simply in terms of its benefits for individual people. While true, this is inadequate. When the cross is placed in the context of the literary structure of the gospels and in the context of the whole biblical story, the cross has cosmic and ecclesiological significance. This talk unfolds the cosmic scope, communal significance, and the transforming power of the cross, all of which produce a missional people. Like the cross, the resurrection has often been shorn of its ecclesiological and missional implications. The resurrection stands at the centre of history with cosmic and communal significance, and this lecture also opens this up with an eye to its missional importance.

Main Session 3: The Significance of the Cross and Resurrection for a Missional Church (Part 2) Michael Goheen
The crucifixion has often been interpreted simply in terms of its benefits for individual people. While true, this is inadequate. When the cross is placed in the context of the literary structure of the gospels and in the context of the whole biblical story, the cross has cosmic and ecclesiological significance. This talk unfolds the cosmic scope, communal significance, and the transforming power of the cross, all of which produce a missional people. Like the cross, the resurrection has often been shorn of its ecclesiological and missional implications. The resurrection stands at the centre of history with cosmic and communal significance, and this lecture also opens this up with an eye to its missional importance.

Main Session 4: A Phenomenal Dependency Steve Timmis
The church wasn’t some idea that emerged out of Paul’s missionary journeys. Jesus came to create a new stand-out community that would model to the world what it actually looked like when Jesus ruled. When we read his manifesto known as the Sermon on the Mount, we see that it was (and is) something altogether phenomenal. In these sessions, we take a close look at just what it means to be the people of God.

Main Session 5 : The Commissioning of the Risen Christ: Defining Our Identity Michael Goheen
All the gospels end with a commissioning by the resurrected Lord. Often these commissions are interpreted as sending individuals to do evangelistic or mission work. Yet these are words that define the church in terms of its identity and its role in the biblical drama. This session opens up these comissions in terms of the way they define a missional community.

Main Session 6: A Phenomenal Obedience Steve Timmis
The church wasn’t some idea that emerged out of Paul’s missionary journeys. Jesus came to create a new stand-out community that would model to the world what it actually looked like when Jesus ruled. When we read his manifesto known as the Sermon on the Mount, we see that it was (and is) something altogether phenomenal. In these sessions, we take a close look at just what it means to be the people of God.

Facebook Killed the Church

A co-worker at MonkDev posted this article, How Facebook Killed the Church written by Richard Beck, Associate Professor and experimental psychologist at Abilene Christian University. Here are some brief thoughts on a couple of the points made:

Why didn’t Gen X leave the church while the Millennials are leaving in droves? It’s about those cellphones. It’s about relationships and connectivity.

Is Facebook and cell phone connectivity really killing the church? Or is the rise of social networking a reflection of a sociological shift that was already occurring in the US that reinforces the decentralization of power, rejection of modern concepts and the desire for people to seek out new forms of community. The author continues:

Church has always been about social affiliation. You met your friends, discussed your week, talked football, shared information about good schools, talked local politics, got the scoop, and made social plans (“Let’s get together for dinner this week!”).

Why wouldn’t we say that the many who are leaving demonstrate 1 John 2:19. (They went out from us, but they did not really belong to us. For if they had belonged to us, they would have remained with us; but their going showed that none of them belonged to us. ) Cultural Christianity is a deep epidemic in the Church, the numbers (my opinion) would astound us if we actually knew the number of unsaved religious Christians. This comment in the article reinforces the false Christianity. While certainly the church provides a third place of social connectivity that is the not primary reason God formed a community reconciled to Himself to be on mission to the world. As the culture shifts what will take place is that many established churches, which were appropriate in modernity may lose people but in this changing time God is leading others to start new churches that reflect the ideology generation resonates with.

Best Practices for Online Ministry

What are the best tools for ministries to create impact online?

What impact does a ministry web site have on online giving?

How do leading ministries manage their web effort?

What emerging technologies are ministry leaders preparing for?

Through conversations with ministry leaders, it is apparent that there are fundamental differences between how parachurch organizations and local churches do ministry online. As part of Monk Development’s continued commitment to help these organizations to achieve excellence online, we have partnered with the Christian Leadership Alliance to address these differences and identify the significant issues that are impacting ministries.

In preparation for the 2010 Ministry Internet & Technology conference in April, we are leading a survey and analytics study that will identify best practices, trends, and case studies that will bring clarity, guidance, and new opportunities for ministries online.

We invite all ministry leaders and staff to participate in the Excellence in Online Ministry Survey. The survey explores best practices for strategy development, managing web efforts, and maximizing the impact of ministries online.

You are also invited to participate in the Ministry Web Site Effectiveness Study. This study will examine 50-100 ministries’ web site analytics to find performance benchmarks and best practices for effective design and usage of ministry web sites.

Would you like your ministry to participate? We ask that participating ministries to send the Excellence in Online Ministry survey to all staff members who contribute to your web efforts. We also ask that you have Google Analytics set-up on your site for at least 3-months, preferably a year. Participating ministries will receive a free, exclusive report of the findings from this research.

Our hope is that this research will help bring ministries together to learn from each other and increase the effectiveness of our online efforts.

Also see: State of Ministry Online

providing-strategic-clarity

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